Water Treatment in the Dialysis Unit

Comments
Print

Water treatment systems are one of the most important variables in the dialysis treatment equation. They also present one of the greatest hazards to patient outcomes if they are not functioning properly. Therefore, it is essential to understand the key aspects surrounding water treatment in the dialysis unit including common problems, procedures a dialysis clinic can implement to treat its water better, government regulations, current technologies in treating water and future trends in water treatment.

Water Is Life

For each treatment, water is mixed with dialysate concentrate to form the dialysate, which then helps transport metabolic waste and excess fluids from the blood stream of a patient with compromised kidney function. Because the kidneys no longer can filter on their own, if any contaminate is left in the water, then the patient is at risk from many complications, including death.

An extensive water purification system is absolutely critical for hemodialysis because a typical dialysis patient is exposed to approximately 360 liters of water per week where as a healthy person is typically only exposed to 14 liters per week. Averaged out, most patients on hemodialysis are exposed to more water in three years than most people are exposed to in their lifetime. Furthermore, water makes up approximately 90 percent of the required dialysate solution, which is the suspension required for patients suffering from End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). As a result, it is essential to protect the patients from exposure to excessive levels of contaminates that are commonly found in potable water supplies.

“In a facility setting, water is the only common risk factor that affects all patients receiving treatments. Water that is not treated properly can negatively affect every patient at the same time. No other part of the dialysis process has that potential. As a result, it is essential to protect the patients from exposure to excessive levels of contaminates that are commonly found in potable water supplies,” said Mar Cor Purification’s Medical Product Manager Michael Verguldi.

« Previous12345678910Next »
Comments
comments powered by Disqus